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mrenziboi



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PostSubject: kosher soulfood    Sun May 06, 2012 9:48 pm

wondering if anyone has any kosher soul food recipes? i have seriously been considering becoming more observant and have been searching for kosher soul food recipes...
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searchinmyroots

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PostSubject: Re: kosher soulfood    Mon May 07, 2012 9:42 am

Sorry for the ignorance, but could you please describe "soul food" for me?

I may be mistaken, butI think of foods from the South when I hear soul food.

Please educate me!
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mrenziboi



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PostSubject: Re: kosher soulfood    Mon May 07, 2012 9:50 am

yes i am referring to traditional african American southern food... so yes is southern food but still cooked in a different way. friend chicken, mac and cheese, greens, sweet potatoes, corn bread and so forth while these foods are not unique to african americans the technique of cooking them is often different
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Debbie B.

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PostSubject: Re: kosher soulfood    Mon May 07, 2012 1:07 pm

I believe that traditional "soul food" often uses lard, which is obviously out for kosher food. But you can usually substitute. For deep frying, use vegetable oil. If you need the additional solidity of lard at room temp for the fat and the dish doesn't have any dairy, you can use "schmaltz"= rendered chicken fat, which is used a lot in Ashkenazi food and can be purchased pre-rendered where frozen kosher meat is sold. Or for a pareve fat substitution you can use vegetable shortening or (pareve) margarine. Some common kosher pareve margarine brands are Mother's, Manischewitz, or Fleischmann’s, and I believe that Earth Balance makes a kosher pareve margarine too. Most margarines are considered to be "dairy" by kosher definitions because most use dairy-derived ingredients).

Fried chicken can certainly be kosher. The best fried chicken I've ever tasted is from Great Chicago, a kosher restaurant in Chicago. I'm not a fried chicken expert, but I am comparing it to my past experience with non-kosher fried chicken and my parents were really impressed by it when they visited.

Most of the foods you mention can be cooked in a kosher way. I keep a strictly kosher kitchen and we probably have my husband's mac and cheese (from scratch!) almost once a week and he made corn bread yesterday. What you really need to do is to learn the rules of kashrut and then you will be able to identify whether a recipe is already "kosher" or which aspects might need to be changed. A participant on this website, "maculated", enjoys creating kosher versions of recipes for treif foods, like her "mock clam chowder". I recently tried a certified kosher Chinese flavoring powder used for "Chinese roast pork" on some beef short ribs and I think I will try it on chicken to use for Chinese steamed buns with "mock roast pork" filling.
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Dena

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PostSubject: Re: kosher soulfood    Mon May 07, 2012 1:12 pm

Yes, Earth Balance is kosher and pareve (and gluten free for anyone who cares).
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mrenziboi



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PostSubject: Re: kosher soulfood    Mon May 07, 2012 11:42 pm

thanks this is helpful... i was wondering though is someone had any recipes... i cook often times for friends with all kinds of allergies and have been really good at adapting ingredients but i love seeing what other recipes folks may have... but debbie the info u provided will be really helpful :-)
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Debbie B.

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PostSubject: Re: kosher soulfood    Tue May 08, 2012 12:54 am

So I got curious and did a Google search on "kosher soul food" and found this article with a link to a whole book of kosher Southern cooking!
Kosher Soul Food

And here's another review of the book with links to a few recipes:
Kosher Eye: Simply Southern

Hey, the above webpage has links to lots of kosher recipes---just go to the white stripe where it says "Kosher Recipes" which is a pull-down menu. The first recipe under "Poultry" is "Authentic Southern Fried Chicken". Very interesting in that it creates a "pareve buttermilk substitute"! Anyway, I'm really excited by all these cool recipes, so I'm glad that I went net-surfing. Very Happy
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mrenziboi



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PostSubject: Re: kosher soulfood    Tue May 08, 2012 12:59 am

Debbie i am so glad u did cause i did but i am not a good net surfer apparently cause i looked several times thanks!
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mrenziboi



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PostSubject: Re: kosher soulfood    Tue May 08, 2012 1:18 am

sigh i looked up the recipes and the books while i can use the recipes it is not quite what i was looking for. it was more southern food and less soul food. we shall see i will post something if i find something or if i master a recipe
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mrenziboi



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PostSubject: Re: kosher soulfood    Tue May 08, 2012 1:24 am

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Debbie B.

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PostSubject: Re: kosher soulfood    Tue May 08, 2012 2:58 am

Interesting. My son loves collard greens, but I just cook them pareve with a lot of garlic and leave them still somewhat bright green and a little crunchy (my Chinese heritage means that I don't like well-cooked vegetables).

Note that the article "...Uncommonly Delicious" that is linked in the above article has some incorrect information about kosher cooking. You certainly don't need two ovens or two sinks---I have only one of each as do many of our Orthodox Jewish friends and minyan friends who keep kosher homes. You just can't cook meat and dairy in the oven at the same time. And if you don't have a double sink, or two separate sinks, then you need to use separate sink racks or dishpans for dairy and meat dishes. As for two dishwashers---most of our kosher-keeping friends can't afford two or don't have room in their kitchen for two. It is true though that many of our more affluent friends with big kitchens do have two dishwashers. I even know one Orthodox house with two refrigerators, which is certainly not required. Most of our friends with only one dishwasher just keep it only dairy or only meat and do the other dishes by hand. However, some rabbis (even Orthodox ones) hold that it is possible to use a single dishwasher for both dairy and meat loads (although generally not mixed) if one or two cycles (depends on the rabbi) are run empty in between to "kasher". Some say you need two separate sets of racks. I am lucky in having a "double drawer" dishwasher which is really two separate smaller dishwashers so I can use one drawer for dairy and one for meat. It is great in that it fits in the space of one regular dishwasher, but it does cost more than twice what most regular dishwashers do. It was my biggest splurge when I made my kitchen strictly kosher. When I replaced my old dishwasher it was more than ten years old and the racks were chipped and rusting, so I figured it was probably close to failing anyway. (Or so I justified to myself Rolling Eyes )

I should add that we actually have many Jewish friends who are vegetarians so their kitchens are simply dairy and they need only separate dishes and cookware for Passover.

The article also says incorrectly that there is only one brand of pareve margarine and bread. That may be true in St. Louis stores, but there are many brands (including national brands) of both of those available in stores in the Chicago area.


Last edited by Debbie B. on Tue May 08, 2012 11:18 am; edited 1 time in total
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mrenziboi



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PostSubject: Re: kosher soulfood    Tue May 08, 2012 10:00 am

thank you this is helpful :-) as far as keeping a kosher kitchen I am not sure if i will do that if so i will discuss with my rabbi how to best do that :-)
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Debbie B.

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PostSubject: Re: kosher soulfood    Thu May 10, 2012 4:16 pm

So I got curious about soul food and found these two websites with (non-kosher) soul food recipes:
Soul food online recipes
Soul Food Cookbook

Glancing through the recipes, I found that the main treif aspect was pork, and then secondarily mixing meat with dairy, and then treif seafood. But there were a minority of recipes that were just fine from a kashrut perspective. Some of the recipes really can't be made to be kosher; they are just fundamentally treif. But many recipes could be made in a way that would at have a similar (even if not identical) taste.

Here are some substitutions:

- Pork:
Ham: use cured turkey (sometimes called "turkey ham") ---uses same nitrates, so tastes similar
Bacon: there are kosher substitutes called "beef fry" which are cured similarly and have a similar taste; can also use turkey ham

- Meat with dairy:
a) Change the dairy ingredients to pareve
butter > pareve margarine
milk > soy or rice milk (but make sure it is Plain soy milk---my kids will never let me forget the time I accidentally used Vanilla soy milk for pareve mashed potatoes---blech!
cheese > soy cheese (personally, I think these taste like plastic and avoid them)
cream > pareve creamers or soy milk
Here is a webpage with dairy substitutes
b) Change the meat to a meat substitute
ground beef > veggie meat substitute crumbles of various brands
poultry > "Tofurky" or other veggie poultry substitutes
Here is a webpage for meat substitutes

- Shellfish:
shrimp > kosher fake shrimp
crab meat > kosher fake crab meat
Here is a well-known brand of kosher fake shellfish: Dyna-Sea seafood

Note that the substitutes may have different cooking properties so you can't always just do a substitution and have the dish come out OK.
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mrenziboi



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PostSubject: Re: kosher soulfood    Fri May 11, 2012 1:32 am

this is very helpful thank you... the pork will be easy because i dont cook with pork ... the imitation shell fish info will be very useful thanks so much
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Sarit

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PostSubject: Re: kosher soulfood    Fri May 11, 2012 9:37 am

Debbie B. wrote:

- Shellfish:
shrimp > kosher fake shrimp
crab meat > kosher fake crab meat
Here is a well-known brand of kosher fake shellfish: Dyna-Sea seafood


Aw, this is great! We don't have it here, unfortunately, so I'm left with the only possibility of turning my head around when I see shellfish or seafood menu. Lucky you! Very Happy

Thanks, Debbie, for all the informations!
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Mychal

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PostSubject: Re: kosher soulfood    Fri May 11, 2012 1:14 pm

Jimmy Dean has a new product out--turkey crumbles. Last night my husband and I had breakfast burritos for supper: turkey bacon, onion and bell pepper medley, and turkey sausage, topped with some salsa.

Most Southern-fried foods are NOT fried in lard--at least not in Tennessee (I might question Louisiana and Mississippi). You use Crisco if you're skillet frying, while home deep fryers are typically peanut oil; restaurant deep fryers typically use a vegetable oil. Partially-hydrogenated palm kernel oil--or something like it--has a shelf life of years (which is why ho-ho's last forever); lard, like all meat products, spoils after a time. That's why people stopped using it.

Although studies have found that lard is actually not as bad for you as partially-hydrogenated vegetable shortening, so there may be a movement in the future to take frying and baking back to lard.

You may want to check the ingredient lists on your faux shellfish. The stuff they sell around me is fish with a bunch of junk added to it, like corn syrup. I can't have it because it also has sorbitol (a sugar alcohol--normally found in sugar-free foods) in it; I'm allergic to it. Even normal people have to be careful not to consume too much, because sugar alcohols are not digested well and they give people bad gas (and even diarrhea).
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Debbie B.

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PostSubject: Re: kosher soulfood    Fri May 11, 2012 2:15 pm

Mychal wrote:
Jimmy Dean has a new product out--turkey crumbles. Last night my husband and I had breakfast burritos for supper: turkey bacon, onion and bell pepper medley, and turkey sausage, topped with some salsa.
Any meat by "Jimmy Dean" is only suitable if you simply eat minimally "kosher-style". Jimmy Dean turkey is still not kosher. Also, just as a general warning, since the subject of sausage was brought up: if you avoid pork products, you should be careful to read labels for sausage links since many of them, even those made with ground poultry, use pork casings and some may have milk product ingredients too. Back before we started to buy only rabbinically supervised meat, my husband once bought some chicken bratwurst which when I read the small print on the label turned out to have pork casings.

Mychal wrote:

You may want to check the ingredient lists on your faux shellfish. The stuff they sell around me is fish with a bunch of junk added to it, like corn syrup. I can't have it because it also has sorbitol (a sugar alcohol--normally found in sugar-free foods) in it; I'm allergic to it. Even normal people have to be careful not to consume too much, because sugar alcohols are not digested well and they give people bad gas (and even diarrhea).
Few people are going to eat a lot of the kosher fake shellfish because it is quite expensive: about $8 for a 10.5 oz package of fake shrimp. And it is really not a good enough substitute that most people would want eat a whole serving of it straight up like shrimp. We just put a little of it into kosher Paella---maybe a half pound of fake shellfish into 6 quarts of rice, along with more real fish.

Obviously you can't eat it because of a food allergy. But I am not too concerned about the corn syrup in the very limited amounts I eat (a pound a year?). I get a lot more corn syrup in other products even though I read labels carefully and try to avoid food products with a lot of it.
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