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Mychal

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PostSubject: Hebrew?   Fri Sep 23, 2011 2:20 pm

First topic message reminder :

Should we have a section just for Hebrew questions/discussions?

I really need to find someone living/have lived in Israel to ask a couple of Hebrew/social customs of for my book.
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Debbie B.

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PostSubject: English cursive writing   Fri Jan 27, 2012 12:38 am

esf wrote:
Do you really think that English cursive is outdated? I write in cursive, and I've never noticed most other people writing in print, though maybe I just haven't been paying attention.
My 17 year old daughter says that when the kids had to take some standardized test in high school (ACT?) they were required to write out some paragraph in cursive, I think so that handwriting analysis could be used if there were suspicions of cheating. And some of the kids had a really hard time doing that because they had all but forgotten the letter forms. After they were out of elementary school and cursive writing was not required, many of them reverted to printing. And of course they type a lot of their assignments these days. In fact, they are sometimes required to electronically post their assignments, so they have to be "typed".

My 14 year old son has a hard time reading cursive. Sometimes he asks for help in reading if he gets a note from an older relative who writes in cursive.

I have also noticed that my kids aren't very good at reading analog clocks with hands. Then again, they are both mildly dyslexic, so there may be some other issues.
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usuario



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PostSubject: Re: Hebrew?   Fri Jan 27, 2012 1:41 pm

In everyday handwriting, Israelis use the "cursive" Hebrew (I don't like the term cursive because the letters aren't connected, I prefer calling it "handwritten Hebrew"). In books and media, the "print" letters of the type seen in the Torah are used. Occasionally you'll see media written in "cursive" letters to convey more of a casual tone, like in ads. There is a third type of lettering called "Rashi script" which Rashi's commentary on the Talmud and Torah are traditionally printed in, but I don't know of anyone who writes like that.

Taking a Modern Hebrew class, I instinctively write in the "cursive" Hebrew and I need to think for a couple of seconds before I remember how to write a "print" letter, especially if the print letter is really different (think: mem, aleph, and shin, for example). Yet I have no trouble reading text written in "print" characters in the textbook or in a siddur. I once dated a Jewish woman who had this "problem" too because she often writes in Hebrew, and I'm thinking it's a common issue among people who do a lot of handwriting Hebrew vs. typing it :)
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Debbie B.

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PostSubject: Re: Hebrew?   Fri Jan 27, 2012 2:39 pm

Rashi script is just a typeface, and as far as I know is only used for Rashi's commentaries or related commentaries. My daughter had to learn to read it for her Talmud class. On the following page of Talmud, the text in the middle rectangular block is Mishnah and Gemara and the text immediately surrounding are Rashi and Tosafot in Rashi script:
A page of Talmud
If you click on the surrounding commentary sections, you get an explanation along with a link to an explanation about Rashi script. As you can see, Rashi script is used in the same way as when a modern chumash puts the commentary in a different font from the English translation of the Torah text so that the font indicates that the texts are from different sources. No one "writes" in Rashi script.

The place I most often see Hebrew cursive in my everyday life in the US is for product names on Israeli food products. Here's an example that I randomly found:
Halva package
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Mychal

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PostSubject: Re: Hebrew?   Fri Jan 27, 2012 2:59 pm

Quote :
Do you really think that English cursive is outdated?

I've heard that some schools don't even teach it anymore. When people write anything by hand, the most common form of handwriting is indeed a print-cursive hybrid. I bleed certain letters together--"e's" are commonly bled into another letter. Certain capital letters also slur into the second letter of the word.

Quote :
Well, "Adon" is Modern Hebrew which might not be correct for the 1500's. And maybe "Mar" would be used in the 1500's to refer to someone who is nearly 1500 years old in a nod to the address from his earlier years. I think the archaic nature of that form of address would give nice color to your story.

Interesting. I will definitely consider it, then. As I'm dealing with vampires, archaic can be a relative term, LOL.
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Mychal

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PostSubject: Re: Hebrew?   Fri Jan 27, 2012 5:42 pm

Hmm, but do you think the title might get confused with the Biblical word, mar, which means bitterness?
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Debbie B.

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PostSubject: Re: Hebrew?   Sun Jan 29, 2012 3:14 am

@Mychal: you could put in an explanation the meaning of Mar when a character is told about or introduced to Joshua, or you could even have someone assume that the "Mar" means bitterness and use it in some deprecating way and then have Joshua correct him about the origins of the title.
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